A Fan … (or a stalker!!)

My first impressions of Roses were that it was a little disappointing and I have to admit that I’ve seen many places that are cuter, more picturesque, less concrete touristy and to be frank, just plain better. But there really is something about this place that has got to me. Some of that is undoubtedly the convivial company, I’ve new pals in John, Iris and Graham. And then there is Sue; Sue is one of my regular readers and, bless her, followed my route from Mirepoix, via Argeles to Roses just to come spend a couple of nights here and meet me. She even took the twisty windy route. How fabulous is that? I’ve got a fan …  (or a stalker!!) Safe journey home Sue, see you in Yorkshire!

I think one of Roses (pronounced Rosas locally) charms is that it remains a working fishing port and town; it therefore has a heart, unlike Argeles Plage which is pure tourist spot/marina. Roses has a lot of history; its first invaders, long after the Stone Age peoples left their hill-top settlement, were the Greeks. They left their mark with the first harbour. After them it was quiet hereabouts for a few hundred years until the Romans turned up (as they did, everywhere) and built on top of the Greek ruins. All went quiet again for a few more hundred years after the Roman Empire collapsed, until the Moors arrived. The Moors got overthrown by the Christians after another few hundred years. Things then went relatively quiet again for yet another few hundred years and Roses became a quiet, backwater fishing village … until the tourist hordes “discovered” it.

Doing the mending

Backdrop Pyrenees

The “quiet” season

I’m having a good time, thanks to having a social life, my three night stop is turning into three weeks. Current (and as usual, flexible) plan is to stay for a bit longer before heading down towards Barça. I can’t believe it’s only three weeks til the descendants arrive …

🙂 🙂 🙂

Holá Roses

There are three choices of road to take from Argeles-sur-Mer to get into Spain. First route, the A9, the toll road, is the fastest. Second route is the 900 which runs close to the A9 but is non-motorway, non-toll and a bit slower. Third route is the coastal route, slowest of the three BUT the most spectacular (and one of my favourites). It twists round the cliffs, not often terribly steeply but drops down into coastal villages and then back up the cliffs again about seven times. The twists are frequently 180° and the last time I drove it there were a lot of places where there were no crash barriers on the cliff edge; the road surface was appalling and the camber not so great at times. Definitely not the road of choice for wet and/or windy days as its not overly wide either.

So on Saturday it was great to wake up to bright sun, cloudless sky and no wind. I’ll say no more, you know which road I chose don’t you, dear Regular Reader? I’ve never before thought of the French as spoilers of fun, but they have and still are taking some of the  scary out of the route. It’s being widened, resurfaced, re-cambered with concrete barriers being installed to save the unwary from driving off into the Mediterranean. Needless to say French car drivers are increasing their speed accordingly and very annoyed by the drivers of 3.5 ton trucks holding them up! (I did pull over in the villages to let the not-very-long queues pass me.) I grinned maniacally all the way and admired the views as much as one dares on hairpin bends!

I was reminded again, as I passed another memorial just over the border in Spain, of the Basque refugees coming over these passes 80 years ago to escape Franco’s troops. They didn’t have the modern day choices of route to follow or the time to pick decent weather to traverse them, and I bet they weren’t that impressed by the views either.

It’s been difficult to realise that Roses is in Spain, French motorhomers having the vast majority of the pitches here. It’s a nice enough place but without much character as the cute fishing village it once was is now a concrete “paradise” of hotels and apartment blocks. There are still a lot of working boats in the port which is quite distinct from the marina. There’s a nice long promenade for strolling, dog walking, cycling, roller blading, and skateboarding, whichever is your bag, and once again the bar, restaurant and shop owners are making preparations for the tourist onslaught.

Roses fishing port and the marina

Sunday early evening stroll and teensy little aperitif

(LWD was miffed I didn’t share the peanuts)

The cultural diversion inland starts tomorrow, how long it lasts will depend entirely on nighttime temperatures. I admit to being a wuss – at my age I’m entitled!

🙂 🙂 🙂